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The mission of the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation ministry is to explore CSA's distinct contribution to the ongoing, nonviolent transformation of the world towards peace, justice and ecology. This work embraces the efforts of sisters, associates, co-workers and others who share the CSA vision. We live out the mission to bring about systemic change by using the lens of nonviolence to focus on the issues of women, children, health care, globalization (especially as it affects Latin America), seamless ethic of life.

Note: The ideas and opinions expressed in this blog are solely those of the author's and should not be ascribed to the Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes or its members.


 

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Resources/Actions (April 13)

April 13, 2021
By Sister Ruth Battaglia, CSA

Care of Creation

Care of Earth

In the book of Genesis we are to told to have "dominion" over the earth (Gen1:28) and to "till it and keep it" (Gen 2:15).  In Laudato Sí
Pope Francis tells us that we must understand these words in their Scriptural context.  " 'Tilling' refers to cultivating, ploughing or working, while "keeping" means caring, protecting, overseeing and preserving.  This implies a mutual responsibility between human beings and nature. Each community can take from the bounty of the earth whatever it needs for subsistence, but it also has a duty to protect the earth and to ensure its fruitfulness for coming generations." (# 67)

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Kiss the Ground is a new film how about how regenerating the world’s soils has the potential to rapidly stabilize Earth’s climate, restore lost ecosystems, and create abundant food supplies. This film explains why transitioning to regenerative agriculture could be key in rehabilitating the planet, while simultaneously invigorating a new sense of hope and inspiration in viewers. To register, view a trailer and download a free screenings kit Click Here
 
Wednesday, April 21 at 1:00 pm Interfaith Power and Light. will also host a webinar “Sacred Ground, a Message of Hope.” There will be a conversation with Kiss the Ground filmmaker, Josh Tickell, and Faith in Place’s Statewide Outreach Director, Veronica Kyle, on what congregations can do to be part of the solution to food justice and climate justice. When you register to view the film, you will also receive the Zoom link to join the webinar.

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Life Cycle of a Plastic Bottle

Watch this 1:11 minute video that shows the entire destructive lifecycle of a plastic bottle -- from the fossil fuel extraction required to make single-use plastic to the dumping grounds where these bottles inevitably wind up after disposal. 

 

 

Here I Am Production

Premiering Online in Conjunction with Emancipation Day the week of April 16, 2021

Register for the Free online event at the Eventbrite: bit.ly/HereIAm21 

“Our ancestors have waited patiently through centuries for us to come to the table of acknowledgement. Here I Am fulfills my desire to give voice to those families, including my own, and to our tenacity and strength as a people — to close the full circle where we began our American lives three centuries ago and where we are today.” –Mélisande Short-Colomb

A native of New Orleans who began her studies at Georgetown in 2017 at the age of 63, Mélisande Short-Colomb is a direct descendant of Abraham Mahoney and Mary Ellen Queen who were among the 314 members of the group known today as the GU272, enslaved people owned and sold by the Maryland Jesuits in 1838 to rescue Georgetown University from insolvency and bankruptcy.  More than an autobiographical chronicle, this ritualistic experience weaves narrative, music, and imagery, inviting the audience on an experiential journey exploring Colomb’s loving and complicated relationship with the institution that enslaved her ancestors. Interrogating uncomfortable truths, rather than offering easy answers, HERE I AM challenges participants to bear witness and to reckon with their own histories, and to imagine the future of racial justice in America.

For more information, visit the Here I Am page.

Supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and by the Office of the President at Georgetown University.

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